Seminar Archive


April 18, 2017

Title: Climate and Transportation - What's the Big Deal?

Presenter: Esther Mullens

ABSTRACT: Extreme weather, such as heat waves, cold waves, heavy precipitation, and winter storms, is well known to impact transportation safety and state of good repair. The Southern Plains Transportation Center has made climate adaptive transportation a focus of their research activities, based on the understanding that adapting and mitigating the impacts of extreme conditions require coordinated and innovative solutions. Climate variability and change is associated with changes in the frequencies and/or intensities of adverse events. In some cases, these changes may be such that using only historical climate information in planning and design may no longer be sufficiently accounting for the potential range of extreme conditions that the transportation system is likely to encounter.

In this seminar, we will present some detailed climatological information for the South Central U.S, focusing in particular on central Oklahoma. A large suite of historical and future datasets was evaluated, based on observations and high-resolution climate model projections. Exert input was solicited in order to determine the relevant climate variables and thresholds. Our results support the potential for some substantial shifts in climate normals, and implications to the transportation sector will be discussed. In addition, we will identify initiatives and resources are currently in place to support the use of climate future information in infrastructure planning, and the challenges that remain to be overcome.

April 6, 2016

Title: Career Opportunities and Leadership Development in Transportation Fields

BIO:  Dawn Sullivan was recently named the Director of Capital Programs at ODOT, the first woman to serve on ODOT’s executive staff. She is a civil engineering graduate of the University of Oklahoma, and a Registered Professional Engineer. She has worked in various capacities for the Oklahoma Department of Transportation for 27 years, most recently as the Environmental Programs Division Engineer, and prior to 2007, the Planning & Research Division Engineer. In her role as Director of Capital Programs, she oversees ODOT’s Project Management Division, with responsibility for delivery of ODOT’s 8 Year Construction Work Plan; Strategic Assets and Performance Management Division; Local Government Division; Facilities Management Division; Rail Programs Division; as well as Waterways Branch, and ODOT’s Tribal Liaison Program.

ABSTRACT: The Transportation Leadership Council (TLC) and the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Student Chapter at OU are pleased to host Ms. Dawn Sullivan, Director of Capital Programs, at the Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT). Ms. Sullivan will provide students with a look at the inner workings of ODOT and the transportation industry as she discusses career opportunities, leadership development and challenges at ODOT and within transportation fields in general.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title: Field Investigation of Spread Slab Beam Bridge Systems and Development of Design Parameters

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BIO:  Dr. Mary Beth Hueste is a Professor in the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University. She joined Texas A&M University in 1998 where she is a member of the structural engineering faculty. Dr. Hueste is the Major Highway Structures Program Manager within the Texas A&M Transportation Institute. She is a Fellow of the American Concrete Institute (ACI) and Chair of ACI-ASCE Committee 352 (Joint and Connections in Monolithic Concrete Structures). Dr. Hueste conducts research focused on earthquake resistant design of reinforced concrete structures, performance-based seismic design, design and evaluation of prestressed concrete bridge structures, and assessment of aging and historic infrastructure. She has authored or co-authored over 70 technical papers and reports. She is a registered professional engineer in Kansas and Texas and holds a BS from North Dakota State University, a MS from the University of Kansas, and a PhD from the University of Michigan; all in Civil Engineering.

ABSTRACT: The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) uses precast prestressed concrete slab beam bridges in a side-by-side configuration as an alternative to prestressed concrete I-girder bridges for short span bridges in low clearance areas. In order to reduce costs, a new bridge type called a spread slab beam bridge was recently developed using the same concept as spread box beam bridges in which the beams are spaced apart. The research team evaluated spread slab beam bridges in terms of design, constructability, and performance. Forty-four bridge geometries were designed using standard TxDOT slab beam types to determine the feasible design space. One of the most challenging geometries with widely spaced slab beams was constructed at full-scale in the field. The bridge was tested under static and dynamic vehicular loads to evaluate constructability and structural performance. Another in-service spread slab beam bridge was also instrumented and tested to obtain important insight on the performance of the new bridge system with more closely spaced beams. The load distribution behavior was investigated in the field testing and the measured data of both bridges was utilized to validate computational modeling techniques for this new bridge system.

Based on the research findings, it is concluded that spread slab beam systems that utilize precast concrete panels with a cast-in-place concrete deck provide a viable construction method for short-span bridges. For both tested bridges, the desired performance was achieved for in-service loading. During field testing the beam live load deflections were within the design limits and no significant cracking or reduction in the overall stiffness of the bridge was observed. Experimental load distribution factors (LDFs) were evaluated using alignments that provided the most adverse loading cases. In addition, LDFs for design were developed based on computational models of spread slab beams with varying geometric parameters.

DECEMBER 13, 2015

Title: Swelling Clays and Pavement Applications: Their Characterizations and Stabilization Using Geosynthetics

BIO:  Dr. Jorge G. Zornberg, P.E., is Professor in the Geotechnical Engineering program at the University of Texas at Austin. He earned his B.S. from the National University of Cordoba (Argentina), his M.S. from the PUC of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley (USA). He served as President of the International Geosynthetics Society (IGS). His research focuses on geosynthetics, soil reinforcement, pavements, and environmental geotechnics. He has authored over 350 technical publications, written a number of book chapters, and been awarded three patents. He received a number of prestigious awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) awarded by President George W. Bush to Prof. Zornberg in 2002.

ABSTRACT: The presence of expansive clays has led to poor performance of flexible pavements, which typically develop significant longitudinal cracks during periods of drought. This presentation includes innovations in: (1) the characterization of expansive clays, and (2) the use of geosynthetics to stabilize pavements where their presence is prevalent.

A novel approach for characterization of the swelling of clays, involving centrifuge technology, has been recently developed. The procedure involves soil samples subjected to water infiltration during comparatively small testing periods. What makes the centrifuge approach special is that the variable of interest (i.e. the vertical rise) is directly measured. The centrifuge approach was found to be well-suited for pavement design because it provides the full relationship between vertical strains and vertical stresses. Consequently, this approach is particularly appropriate for use with the Potential Vertical Raise (PVR) approach.

The second part of the presentation includes the results of a comprehensive research program conducted to assess the use of geosynthetic reinforcements to mitigate pavement problems associated with expansive clays. Specifically, stabilization of the pavement base course has been successfully used by the Texas Department of Transportation. A comprehensive field evaluation was conducted as part of this study, which involved the construction of 32 test sections with multiple types of geosynthetic reinforcement, lime treatment, and control sections. The benefits of using geosynthetic reinforcements were clearly quantified.

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NOVEMBER 16, 2015

Title: Modeling of Rutting Using the Unified Disturbed State Concept
Presentation Slides (PDF)

BIO:  Dr. Desai is renowned, and recognized internationally for his significant and outstanding contributions in research, teaching, applications and professional work in a wide range of topics in engineering. Dr. Desai’s research on the development of the innovative disturbed state concept (DSC) for constitutive modeling of materials and interfaces/joints has been adopted for research and taught in many countries. In conjunction with nonlinear finite element method, it provides an innovative and alternative procedure for analysis, design and reliability for challenging nonlinear problems of modern technology. He is credited with introducing the interdisciplinary definition of Geomechanics that involves various areas such as geotechnical engineering and rock mechanics, static and dynamics of interacting structures and foundations, fluid flow through porous media, geoenvironmental engineering, natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides and subsidence, petroleum engineering, offshore and marine technology, geological modeling, geothermal energy, ice mechanics, and lunar and planetary systems.

ABSTRACTFlexible pavements comprise more than 90 percent of paved roads in the United States. Although flexible pavements are widely used for reasons such as cost, constructability and performance, they often exhibit rutting. Rutting is the accumulation of longitudinal depressions under the wheel paths caused by the repeated traffic loads. Rut is a major concern for the integrity of pavement structure and traffic safety. In this presentation, numerical modeling of rutting will be discussed. The presentation will specifically focus on material modeling using the unified disturbed state concept (DSC), developed by Desai and used by the geomechanics community world-wide for modeling of materials and interfaces. Pertinent laboratory testing and evaluation of material parameters will also be discussed. Finally, validations (specimen-level and boundary value problem-level) of the DSC model will be presented.

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November 13, 2015

Title: Accelerated Bridge Construction University Transportation Center

BIO:  Dr. Azizinamini received his B.S. with Distinction from University of Oklahoma and was Distinguished College of Engineering Professor and Director of National Bridge Research Organization at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, before joining Florida International University in January 2011. He has received number of national awards, including: 2015 White House Champion of Change, Transportation Innovator, 2011 American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), Special Achievement Award and several bridge innovation awards. Atorod has served as consultants on major bridge engineering initiatives including service life design of Tappan Zee Bridge in New York. He is a registered professional engineer in Nebraska and Montana.

ABSTRACT: Dr. Atorod Azizinamini, P.E., is Professor, Chairperson of Civil and Environmental Engineering Department and Director of Accelerated Bridge Construction (ABC) University Transportation Center (UTC) at Florida International University. At the present, he is leading several research projects related to ABC.

Atorod has developed several bridge engineering products and systems that are being used nationally and internationally. Among the bridge systems that he has developed is Folded Steel Plate Bridge System that is being used in several states, including 13 short span (less than 60 ft.) bridges that will be constructed, using ABC, in Pennsylvania in 2016.

Under SHRP2 R19A he led the development of the first and most comprehensive document worldwide and devoted to service life design of bridges. This document is now being implemented by AASHTO and FHWA.

March 12, 2015

Title: Fatigue Performance of Asphalt Pavements Containing RAS and RAP
Presentation Slides (PDF)

ABSTRACT:  With increased environmental awareness, using reclaimed asphalt shingles (RAS) and reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in pavements have been gaining momentum nationally and globally. Despite their advantages, there are national concerns associated with fatigue and low-temperature cracking potential of pavements when containing increased amounts of RAS and RAP. This workshop is focused on the fatigue performance of hot-mix asphalt (HMA) containing RAS and RAP. Specifically, changes in fatigue resistance and cycles to fatigue failure with changes in the amount of RAS and RAP will be discussed in light of laboratory data from flexural fatigue (four-point beam) and axial fatigue (cyclic direct tension) tests on laboratory compacted specimens. Effect of virgin binder grade on the fatigue performance will also be examined. In addition, the effect of RAS and RAP on creep compliance and dynamic modulus of HMA will be highlighted. The laboratory study covered in this workshop involved eight different surface course mixes (S4) with different types of asphalt binders (i.e., PG 64-22 OK and PG 70-28 OK). Mixes were designed using different amounts of RAS and RAP and tested in the laboratory. The amount of RAS and RAP in HMA mixes varied, but the total amount of replaced binder was kept limited to 30% (binder replacement). The results from this study were used to make recommendations on the use of RAS and RAP in HMA mixes. These recommendations will be discussed in this workshop.

December 4, 2014

Title: Evolution of AASHTO-based Bridge Design
Presentation Slides (PDF)

Time: Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 10:30 am-noon

Location: ODOT, 200 NE 21st Street | Oklahoma City, OK

BIO:  A graduate of Lafayete College and Lehigh University, Dr. Kulicki has over forty years of experience in virtually all aspects of bridge analysis and design including suspension, cable-stayed, and long-span truss and arch bridges. He joined Modjeski and Masters in 1974, retired from full time service at the end of 2013 and is now Chairman Emeritus and Senior Technical Advisor. His experience includes design, research, code development, and teaching. Designs he has led have won many awards including the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement awards and three American Institute of Steel Construction’s (AISC’s) Prize Bridge awards. Kulicki has authored more than 80 technical papers and presentations, and has contributed to three engineering handbooks. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has received numerous awards, most recently AISC’s Kimbrough Award. John is both a user of, and a contributor to, the AASHTO Bridge Design Specifications having led the 50-­‐‑member team of experts in the development of the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications.

ABSTRACT:  The bridge design specifications promulgated by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) is the primary source of technical guidance for highway bridge designers in the United States. The various states may make exceptions to
these provisions and the basic document has been the basis of national specifications in many other countries. This presentation will discuss the pre-AASHTO years from the late 1800’s until the early 1900’s and review the design philosophies utilized by AASHTO to provide structural safety. Engineers have been reacting to the lessons taught by natural forces, man-made loadings and socio-economic factors throughout history. This
presentation also looks at how failures caused by underestimating natural forces and material limitations have influenced bridge design specifications in the U.S., particularly the earlier AASHTO Standard Specifications
and the current AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications, as well as the knowledge base and the state of professional practice. Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-­LU). Funding will continue for the LTBP program in the current legislation, Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-­21).

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July 28, 2014

Title: Innovative Road Construction in India
Presentation Slides (PDF)

Time: Monday, July 28, 2014 10:30 am-noon

Location: ODOT, 200 NE 21st Street | Oklahoma City, OK

BIO:  Dr. Braj Bhushan Pandey earned his bachelor, master and doctoral degrees from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur, India. Dr. Pandey is an internationally renowned researcher in the area of pavement engineering, contributing in this field throughout the past four decades. He currently serves as the advisor to the Sponsored Research and Industrial Consultancy Department at the IIT.

Previously, Dr. Pandey served as a professor in the Civil Engineering Department at the IIT, and headed the same department for many years. He has made extensive contributions in the research and development of mechanistic design procedures for flexible and rigid pavements in India. Dr. Pandey has authored many Indian standards and codes related to the design and evaluation of pavements. His innovative ideas for cell filled concrete pavement, cement grouted asphalt wearing course, paneled concrete pavement and rehabilitation of urban road with foamed reclaimed asphalt pavement materials have made him a prominent figure in the Indian pavement construction industry. Dr. Pandey’s research findings have been published in more than 300 national and international journal papers, research reports and newspaper articles.    

ABSTRACT:  A number of innovative pavement projects were constructed in India using both concrete and asphalt mixes. The main objectives for each of the projects were (i) constructing a durable and climate adaptive pavement and (ii) keeping construction and maintenance cost low. Both low and high volume roads were included in the trial constructions. Four case studies using the following pavement types will be discussed:
   1)  Cell filled concrete pavements: This technology consists of placing a honeycomb like formwork of plastic cells over a compacted base, then filling the cells with various types of cement concrete mixes.
   2)  Climate adaptive water and oil resistant cement grouted asphalt wearing course: This technology consists of laying an asphalt coated open graded aggregate as a wearing course over a base course, grouting it with a slurry of cement/fine sand/fly-ash/silica-fumes/super-plasticiser and water.
   3)  Paneled concrete pavements:  This technology consists in laying 4” to 7” thick concrete slabs with 2’x2’ to 4’x4’ panel sizes.
   4)  Rehabilitation of an urban street by RAP and foamed asphalt mixes: A street of Kolkata namely, Prince Anwer Shah Lane, was rehabilitated by using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) materials with foamed asphalt so that the level of the road surface does not rise further.


Click image for PDF file.

Click image for PDF file.

April 24, 2014

Title: Important Aspects of Chemical Stabilization of Fine-Grained Soils
Presentation Slides (PDF)

Time: Thursday, April 24th, 2014 3:00-5:00 pm

Location: ODOT Training Center, 1025 SE 59th Street | Oklahoma City, OK 73129

Speakers: Dr. Amy Cerato, P.E. and Dr. Gerald Miller, P.E., both of the School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science at the University of Oklahoma

Topics: This seminar will focus on three topics:
1) The state of the practice relative to selecting a stabilizer and determining the optimum additive content based on soil properties. Reference will be made to local practice and the use of Oklahoma Highway Department method OHD L-50.
2) Adverse reactions and unexpected outcomes from chemical stabilization. This part of the seminar will focus on adverse chemical reactions with particular emphasis on how to address soils containing sulfate. Discussions of techniques to measure sulfate content and methods for reducing sulfate induced problems in stabilized soil will be presented.
3) Determination of the additive content of compacted soils in the field. Methods of determining the amount of additive in soil samples obtained from the field will be discussed. Such methods are important for quality control/quality assurance considerations and for forensic investigations. Traditional methods as well as, a new and simple, yet powerful technique will be presented.

Cost: A fee of $30/person will help cover the costs of conducting the seminar. Since ODOT has graciously supplied the venue for this seminar, employees of ODOT are exempt from this fee. Checks or money orders should be made payable to the “OU Foundation” (or “OUF”) with “SPTC” in the notes section.

Professional Development Hours: A certificate of attendance will be provided to those persons attending the entire two-hour seminar. The seminar is worth 2 PDH credits. You must sign in to receive the certificate.


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Click Image for PDF file.

April 16, 2014: 

Title: Long Term Bridge Performance Program – An Update

Time: Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Location: ODOT, 200 N.E. 21st Street | Oklahoma City, OK | Lobby Area, 1st Floor, Commission Room

Speaker: Ali Maher, Center for Advanced Infrastructure & Transportation, School of Engineering, Rutgers University

Abstract:
Federal, State, and local transportation agencies are responsible for the stewardship and management of the more than 590,000 bridges in the United States. This involves many planning, operational, maintenance, and economic challenges. To help overcome these challenges and foster the next generation of bridge and bridge management systems, the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Office of Infrastructure Research and Development launched the Long-Term Bridge Performance (LTBP) program in April 2008, a major strategic initiative designated as a flagship research project. The LTBP program is intended to be a minimum 20-year research effort, with the global objective of collecting scientific-quality data from the Nation's highway bridges, as critical node-points of the highway transportation network. The data and information collected in this program will provide a more detailed and timely picture of bridge health, improve knowledge of bridge performance, and ultimately promote the safety, mobility, longevity, and reliability of the Nation's highway transportation assets. The program was created in legislation for surface transportation enacted by the U.S. Congress in 2005: the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). Funding will continue for the LTBP program in the current legislation, Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21).

Bio:
Dr. Ali Maher is a professor of civil and environmental engineering and the director of the Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation (CAIT), a National USDOT Transportation Center (UTC) at Rutgers University. Dr. Maher is the principle investigator of FHWA’s Long term Bridge Performance Program and has more than 25 years of experience in all aspects of transportation infrastructure engineering and management. He is a pioneer in development of agency/academia/industry collaboration and partnerships in the U.S. Under his leadership CAIT has become a center of excellence in advanced transportation infrastructure and management research and education. He has authored more than 150 papers and reports in prestigious journals and proceedings dealing with a multitude of civil and transportation infrastructure issues and a frequent invited speaker at technical societies and public forums.


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Click Image for PDF file.

March 18, 2014:

Title: Temperature Prediction Model of Flexible Pavement in Taiwan

Time: Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Location: ODOT, 200 N.E. 21st Street | Oklahoma City, OK | Lobby Area, 1st Floor, Commission Room

Speaker: Yu-Min Su, Center for Advanced Infrastructure & Transportation, School of Engineering, Rutgers University

Abstract:
Federal, State, and local transportation agencies are responsible for the stewardship and management of Prediction of pavement temperatures and variation of temperature within the pavement is important to 
pavement design and performance evaluation. A temperature prediction model is developed to 
accommodate warmer subtropical climate and thicker pavements in Taiwan. Three pavement sections were 
constructed and instrumented to collect temperature data. Results showed that the peak temperature of AC 
layer occurred between noon and 2:00 p.m., while the maximum temperature in the base layer is aNained after 5:00 p.m. Outgoing radiation, convection energy, and conduction energy were found to influence pavement temperature. Two sinusoidal functions were fiNed based on the representative monthly temperature measurements and validated for AC and base layers. Results from this study enable field engineers to interpret FWD data rationally and accurately by incorporating the proposed models with in-situ ambient temperature and pavement surface temperature. The proposed models can be used to predict pavement temperature under weather extremes. 

Bio: Dr. Su, Yu-Min currently works as a Post-Doctoral Fellow of National Science Council at the Department of Civil Engineering, National Central University, Chungli, Taiwan. NCU is also his Alma Mater of Bachelor and Master of Science degrees. Dr. Su received his Ph.D. degree in Civil and Coastal Engineering from University of Florida (UF). During his Ph.D. work, he received a Fellowship from the International Road Federation (IRF) in 2008 and aNended a technical training in X-ray computed tomography to become a certified operator since 2009. Dr. Su also received three consecutive outstanding achievement awards from 2010 to 2012 at UF and graduated in 2012. His research interests include nondestructive testing and evaluation in composite materials with X-ray computed tomography, mechanical and thermal analysis of pavement materials, creep and shrinkage evaluations in concrete, and pavement frictional properties assessments. He serves as the IRF sector coordinator in Taiwan and is a member of the TC-2 pavement sub-commiNee of Road Engineering Association of Asia and Australia (REAAA).